The Story Of Sam Huff

Huff’s parents reluctantly let her join the army when she was 16 and she quickly gained a reputation for enthusiasm and grit. ‘She’s the bravest kid I’ve ever known,’ said her father, Robert Huff. ‘She was up and down that damned road between Baghdad and the airport, which is notorious for improvised explosive devices. But she knew the risks and believed in the mission.’

“I can’t count how many times Private Huff said this to me day after day. Always with a smile and a laugh after she said it. Followed by, ‘I wouldn’t change where I’m at for anything.’ That’s the kind of person she was. In all honesty she was a model; a model Soldier.”

According to her battalion commander, Lieutenant Colonel James Switzer, she was not a typical Soldier.

“Within two weeks of her arriving in our unit, even I knew who she was,” Switzer said. “Battalion commanders get to know their Soldiers for two reasons. They got in trouble or they are very unique individuals. Private Huff was a unique individual. Her smile could light up a room. She could lighten the mood of any hardcore (noncommissioned officer) and even bring a smile to an old warrior’s face.”

Switzer told his fellow Soldiers that he had spoken to Huff’s parents. They told him they knew their daughter might perish in combat, but that Huff felt she was doing what she always wanted to do; serve in the United States Army. Huff felt she was in the right place, doing the right thing, with the right people.

“If you knew Sam at all, you knew her two loves; dancing and her fiancé Nick,” Lathers said. “That girl would dance any time she got the chance, I’d catch her dancing in our room, dancing down the hall. She danced with a confidence and grace most people lack. 18 is a tender age to leave this world. But know this, she lived a life that many people only dream about.”

Huff’s team leader, Sergeant Sam James praised her for her beauty as well as her brains.

“Her thirst for knowledge sometimes overwhelmed me as a leader, leaving me scrambling to answer question after question,” James said. “She was also a beautiful young lady, the kind that would turn heads in the mall.”

James continued to extol the virtues of his Soldier.

“You would be hard pressed to find a Soldier that could learn and retain knowledge as fast as she did,” James said. “If I wrote down every positive quality I’d want in a Soldier, Huff would still be better. She was the kind of Soldier that made being a leader in the Army fun.”

Captain Robert Matthews, Huff’s company commander, described which of Huff’s many qualities he will miss the most.

“She was a quiet professional who took her job seriously,” Matthews said. “Her dedication to duty and pursuit of excellence was an example for us all to emulate. Sam was a brave and honorable woman. She did her duty without complaint and earned nothing but respect and admiration from those of us that served with her. Her death was tragic and has left a void that will never be filled.”

Switzer mentioned that Huff will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery, an appropriate resting place for a young hero. “I can bet you the sun will be shining that day (the day she will be laid to rest), and up in heaven a bunch of old warriors will be smiling.”


4 Responses to “The Story Of Sam Huff”

  1. Anna Says:

    My daughter is almost the same age and I know how proud I am of her accomplishements, but I cannot imagine losing her. Thank you for sharing a piece of Sam’s life and allowing us to know a truly unique hero!

  2. Bill Smith Says:

    Elsewhere I read that when Sam was hit, her leg was blown off as I recall, people told her to hold on, that she’d be OK. She calmly said, “No, I don’t think I can make it.” Then she gave some private words for her family, and died.

    I don’t know why this particular soldier’s death affects me so much…but, I think Sam Huff, of the New York Giants, is proud to share her name.

    We didn’t think women could handle combat. What damn fools we were.

    Where do we find people like Sam Huff?

    We don’t. They just show up.

  3. Patricia Says:

    I saw this Web site in our local USA Weekend paper and today I decided to log on. Your touching story about Sam Huff was truly inspirational. I am a teacher in an elementary school and I wish I could share this story with our children. I wish the Liberal Media in the United States would publish this story and the many like it, so people could read about the truly heroic soldiers like Sam Huff. God bless you all and know that many here stateside admire and bless you for all you do.

  4. A Rose By Any Other Name » Sam Says:

    […] Now, you may think from the title, this is the story of one of our men in uniform, but no, this story is about a girl, yes, a girl. Sam Huff left this world far too young, but she left it a brighter and happier place just for her having been here. This is her story, courtesy of Grey Eagle at A Female Soldier 2 and her wonderful tributes to our fallen heroes. Huff’s parents reluctantly let her join the army when she was 16 and she quickly gained a reputation for enthusiasm and grit. ‘She’s the bravest kid I’ve ever known,’ said her father, Robert Huff. ‘She was up and down that damned road between Baghdad and the airport, which is notorious for improvised explosive devices. But she knew the risks and believed in the mission.’ […]

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